8 great sites to help your kids learn about money

Wisebread.com and Ashley Eneriz •
Kiplinger

Teaching your children about money is an important, yet often overlooked area of education. Most kids will not want to sit through a lecture about credit card usage and budgeting practices, but they might be more willing to listen to interactive videos and games. These sites make learning about money and money management fun and

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Dependent-care flexible spending accounts aren’t just for kids’ expenses

Kimberly Lankford, Contributing Editor, and Kiplinger's Personal Finance •
Kiplinger

Can I use money from my employer’s dependent-care flexible spending account to pay for adult day care for my elderly mother, or is the account just for child care? The dependent-care FSA isn’t just for children. You can also use the money tax-free to cover care for other dependents while you work. To qualify, the

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Financial planning for special-needs children

Kimberly Lankford, Contributing Editor, and Kiplinger's Personal Finance •
Kiplinger

Jessica and Nathan Pugh’s 5-year-old son, Lachlan, has a rare brain malformation that affects his motor skills, but that doesn’t seem to slow him down much. Lachlan enjoys zipping around in his motorized wheelchair, and he is content to spend hours in the toy aisle at Target. “He’s a very stable, happy and super fun

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Why your kid needs a Roth IRA

Founding Publisher, Editor, Moneypaper, and Vita Nelson •
Kiplinger

As a Kiplinger reader, I’m sure you’re aware of the advantages of a Roth IRA compared with a traditional IRA. The main benefit, of course, is that under current law, qualified Roth IRA distributions aren’t taxed, no matter how much income is reported on the owner’s tax return. What you may not know is that

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When your kids ask how much money you make

Editor and Janet Bodnar •
Kiplinger

Coming from your children, “How much do you make?” is the kind of awkward question that makes parents squirm. Your first inclination may be to blurt out a top-of-the-head answer, such as “That’s none of your business.” You don’t feel comfortable sharing the information, and you’re naturally worried—not without reason—that your kids may let it

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