5 retirement basics for women who want to take charge of investing

Max Hechtman, president, Partner, Max Wealth &, Investment Adviser Representative, and Insurance Solutions •
Kiplinger
businesswoman with digital tablet & financial summary graph sitting outside office building. young asian woman analyzing investment charts outdoors. business people with coffee in disposable paper cup checking marketing data

When it comes to investing, it seems as if men traditionally have run the show. When men worked and more women stayed home to take care of the family, it was the husband’s salary that went into savings, his pension and/or his 401(k), and his Social Security benefits that they would largely rely on someday.

Read More...


What kind of investor are you?

Anne Kates Smith, Senior Editor, and <i>Kiplinger's Personal Finance</i> •
Kiplinger

How would you describe your personality? Adventurous? Shy? Studious? Did you know that you have an investing personality, too? It turns out that when it comes to managing our portfolios, we tend to fall into one of four behavioral types–although there’s usually a little overlap among them. Each type comes with its own set of

Read More...


3 ways to invest like a millionaire

Kiplinger.com, Contributing Writer, and Dan Burrows •
Kiplinger

Most millionaires aren’t born rich. During his three decades researching the wealthy, Thomas J. Stanley, co-author of “The Millionaire Next Door,” consistently found that between 80% and 85% of all millionaires are self-made. Some earned their fortunes through hard work; others, by saving aggressively. Many amassed wealth by investing wisely. Indeed, a study by Spectrem

Read More...


Investors, don’t fear higher rates

Contributing columnist, Jeremy J. Siegel, and Kiplinger's Personal Finance •
Kiplinger

Barring a big shock to the financial markets, the Federal Reserve will raise short-term interest rates at its December meeting. That was Janet Yellen’s clear message in the press conference that followed the Fed’s decision to stand pat in September. All but three of the members of the Federal Open Market Committee–who vote on rate

Read More...