7 smart personal finance moves for military personnel before deployment

Kimberly Lankford, Contributing Editor, and <i>Kiplinger's Personal Finance</i> •
Kiplinger

You and your family already have enough on your mind when you are preparing for deployment. You don’t want to worry about financial issues, too. Fortunately, you do have access to some special programs while deployed that can help your finances long after you return. Your paychecks grow when you receive tax-free income in a

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How to calculate an estimated hourly rate as a marketing contractor, freelancer or consultant

Mark Miller •
Business2Community

We frequently approach marketers with great marketing contract staffing roles and other interim job opportunities. However, one common problem is that they’re unsure what a reasonable rate is for their hourly work. This is especially common in professionals who have spent their entire careers working full-time positions. These days, marketers can get great work as

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Eight money moves that are always a good idea

Holly Johnson •
The Simple Dollar

Between the so-called money experts, your family members, and your friends, you’ve probably endured your share of outdated financial advice and plain old media hype. One person says penny stocks are H-O-T, while others insist they’re an absolute outrage. Your neighborhood real estate agent says the area is a buyer’s market, while the local news tells the story of

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Why financial education works

Editor, <i>Kiplinger's Personal Finance</i>, and Janet Bodnar •
Kiplinger

Bear with me while I climb on my soapbox for Financial Literacy Month. I’ve been wanting to do it ever since I read a recent “squaring off” feature in The Wall Street Journal that presented two opposing views on the question, “Should College Students Be Required to Take a Personal Finance Course?” Taking the “no”

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Dealing with debts after death

<i>Kiplinger's Retirement Report</1>, Mary Kane, and Associate Editor •
Kiplinger

A few years ago, the adult daughter of a deceased client of Indianapolis estate attorney Brett Carlile showed up in his office, distraught. After her father’s death, she discovered he had dozens of credit cards, with debts totaling nearly $40,000. She was stunned. “My dad didn’t live like this,” she told Carlile. It turned out

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