Latest Articles

Why millennials are finally starting to settle down and buy homes

By Gail MarksJarvis •
Chicago Tribune

Millennials are finally starting to show interest in homeownership. Weighed down by massive student debt and job struggles, the generation brutalized by the Great Recession has lacked both the money and the desire to buy homes. They’ve been a generation of renters. But as millennials have entered their 30s, established themselves financially and started having

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Your financial plan shouldn’t include winning the lottery

Shanna Tingom, Heritage Financial Strategies, AAMS®, and Co-Founder •
Kiplinger

If you are worried that you haven’t done what you need to in order to plan for your financial future, you aren’t alone. Fifty-eight percent of Americans say that their financial planning needs improvement, and a whopping 34% haven’t done anything to plan for their financial future, according to a Northwestern Mutual study. The study

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A will can be a beautiful thing

CFP®, Blue Ocean Global Wealth, Marguerita M. Cheng, and CEO •
Kiplinger

Recently, Amy Krouse Rosenthal wrote an essay for The New York Times titled “You May Want to Marry My Husband.” In it, Krouse Rosenthal, who was dying of cancer, created a dating profile for her husband in the hopes that he would find new love after she was gone. Her touching tribute went viral. Hopefully,

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How long should you keep tax records?

Kimberly Lankford, Contributing Editor, and <i>Kiplinger's Personal Finance</i> •
Kiplinger

It’s a good idea to keep your tax returns indefinitely. You can usually toss supporting documents three years after the filing deadline. The IRS generally has to initiate an audit by then. But there are exceptions. Some tax experts recommend holding on to your records for at least seven years.   Among the most important

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Tax Day tip: 3 smart ways to spend your tax refund

Kimberly Lankford, Contributing Editor, and <i>Kiplinger's Personal Finance</i> •
Kiplinger

The average tax refund is around $3,000. If you find yourself sitting on a pile of cash courtesy of your 1040, resist the urge to treat it like play money. Instead, put the windfall to work for you. 1. Invest in your home Your refund won’t be enough to redo your kitchen or bathroom, but

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