More Articles for Your Finances

5 considerations to help you retire wealthy

Max Hechtman, president, Partner, Max Wealth &, Investment Adviser Representative, and Insurance Solutions •
Kiplinger

If you want your nest egg to be robust when you’re ready to retire, you have to take care of it now. That means careful investing and saving. You can’t just go out there and wing it. Here are five things to consider as you build and manage your wealth. 1. Reduce your risk If

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Top 5 Ways to secure your personal information

Arlington Capital Management, Investment Adviser Representative, Justin J. Kumar, and Senior Portfolio Manager •
Kiplinger

Data breaches leaked more than 4 billion records in 2016, according to the IBM X-Force Threat Intelligence Index. While people are getting better at recognizing scams and information hacking, taking preventive measures can help avoid unfortunate problems in the future. Oftentimes you can’t control how third parties use your information, so it’s up to you

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How retirees can use their home’s wealth as an emergency fund

<i>Kiplinger's Retirement Report</i>, Editor, and Rachel L. Sheedy •
Kiplinger

With more baby boomers moving into retirement every day, the wealth locked up in their homes seems ripe for the picking. And a relatively new way to put that wealth to work–the standby reverse mortgage strategy–is garnering increasing attention. Some researchers say the strategy can increase the longevity of a retiree’s portfolio by opening the

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Why financial education works

Editor, <i>Kiplinger's Personal Finance</i>, and Janet Bodnar •
Kiplinger

Bear with me while I climb on my soapbox for Financial Literacy Month. I’ve been wanting to do it ever since I read a recent “squaring off” feature in The Wall Street Journal that presented two opposing views on the question, “Should College Students Be Required to Take a Personal Finance Course?” Taking the “no”

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When not to roll over a 401(k) to an IRA

<i>Kiplinger's Retirement Report</i>, Editor, and Rachel L. Sheedy •
Kiplinger

When leaving your job, the conventional wisdom has long been to take your 401(k) money with you by rolling it into an IRA. And 95% of the time that’s the way to go, says Evan Beach, a certified financial planner for Campbell Wealth Management, in Alexandria, Va. But in some cases, taking the conventional route

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