More Articles for Your Family

How to deal with huge medical bills

Holly Johnson •
The Simple Dollar
Wise hands

A report from the American Journal of Medicine shared some sad statistics about the state of American medical care and medical bankruptcies: A 2009 study revealed that 62.1% of U.S. bankruptcies had a medical cause that year. That figure is in stark contrast to 1981, when only 8% of bankruptcies listed medical debt as a root

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Leaving your digital legacy

Senior Adviser, CFP®, Ken Moraif, and Money Matters •
Kiplinger
Cyber security concept: closed padlock

My mom, who passed away a few years ago, was a very careful and meticulous person who kept a notebook with all of her online account passwords. Mom was also a Morse code operator in the Royal Air Force during WWII, so all of her passwords were in code. I was lucky: She told me

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Leave your loved ones a generous legacy, not a tax bill

Founder, Investment Adviser Representative, Gary Mastrodonato, Masters Wealth Management Group, and CEO •
Kiplinger
silhouette of grandmother and little granddaughter play at sunset

One of the most important things you’ll have to consider when drawing up a comprehensive financial plan is how you want to live in retirement. Ironically, a vital part of that discussion will be deciding what you want to happen when you die. Many Baby Boomers want to leave money to their children and, like

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5 back-to-school items I refuse to buy this year

Holly Johnson •
The Simple Dollar
Group of crayons and pens with retro filter effect

Is there anything that says “summer is basically over” quite like the arrival of next year’s school supply list? Since my children’s school follows a “modified, year-round” schedule, they head back to school today, August 2nd. This is a huge departure from when I was a child; back then, we had three full months of summer, as

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Quiz: How well do you know 529 college plans?

Deborah L. Meyer, Cpa,, WorthyNest Llc, CEO, and Cfp(R) •
Kiplinger
writing

Saving for college keeps getting more challenging. By 2024, the average sticker price for a year at public in-state college is expected to climb to $34,000, and for private school undergrads it could be $76,000, according to the College Board’s 2016 study “Trends in College Pricing.” For people looking for ways to fund future college

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